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Pandemic of spanish flu
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Gripe española - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
El texto dice: «Pandemia de gripe, mortalidad en Estados Unidos y Europa ..... of the Reconstructed 1918 Spanish Influenza Pandemic Virus” en revista Science ...
es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gripe_espa%C3%B1ola
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1918 flu pandemic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The 1918 flu pandemic (January 1918 – December 1920) was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic, the first of the two pandemics involving H1N1 influenza ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic
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The 1918 Influenza Pandemic - virus
The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 killed more people than the Great War, known ... Known as "Spanish Flu" or "La Grippe" the influenza of 1918-1919 was a ...
virus.stanford.edu/uda/
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1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic - 20th Century History - About.com
Historical Importance of the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic: In three waves, the Spanish flu spread quickly, killing an estimated 50 million to 100 million people ...
history1900s.about.com/od/1910s/p/spanishflu.htm
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The Great pandemic :: The United States in 1918-1919 ... - Flu.gov
The Influenza Pandemic occurred in three waves in the United States throughout 1918 and 1919. Learn more about the pandemic, along with the Nation's health ...
www.flu.gov/pandemic/history/1918/
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Pandemic Flu History | Flu.gov
Illness from the 1918 flu pandemic, also known as the Spanish flu, came on quickly. Some people felt fine in the morning but died by nightfall. People who ...
www.flu.gov/pandemic/history/
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The Influenza Epidemic of 1918
Hard as it is to believe, the answer is true. World War I claimed an estimated 16 million lives. The influenza epidemic that swept the world in 1918 killed an ...
www.archives.gov/exhibits/influenza-epidemic/
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1918 Flu Pandemic - Facts & Summary - HISTORY.com
Find out more about the history of 1918 Flu Pandemic, including videos, interesting articles, pictures, historical features and more. Get all the facts on ...
www.history.com/topics/1918-flu-pandemic
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Pandemic Influenza - History of pandemics
In the twentieth century, the world experienced three influenza pandemics: ... The Spanish flu swept across the world in three waves between 1918 and 1919.
www.flupandemic.gov.au/internet/panflu/publishing.nsf/content/history-1
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1918 Flu Pandemic That Killed 50 Million Originated in China ...
23 Jan 2014 ... The deadly "Spanish flu" claimed more lives than World War I, which ended the same year the pandemic struck. Now, new research is placing ...
news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/01/140123-spanish-flu-1918-china-origins-pandemic-science-health/
Resultados de la búsqueda para "Pandemic of spanish flu"
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Pandemic of spanish flu en el ámbito científico
The 1918 Influenza Pandemic - virus
More people died of influenza in a single year than in four-years of the Black Death Bubonic Plague from 1347 to 1351. Known as "Spanish Flu" or "La Grippe"  ...
Gripe española - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
El texto dice: «Pandemia de gripe, mortalidad en Estados Unidos y Europa .... y la gripe española de 1918: epidemias y política sanitaria: Universidad Católica ... the Reconstructed 1918 Spanish Influenza Pandemic Virus” en revista Science ...
1918 flu pandemic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The origin of the Spanish flu pandemic, and the relationship ... by Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin linked the ...
Philadelphia, Nurses, and the Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918
The Spanish Influenza of 1918 was the greatest, most lethal pandemic the world has ever ... By 4 October the University of Pennsylvania's newspaper The Daily ...
Influenza ("Spanish Flu" Pandemic, 1918-19) | Encyclopedia of ...
The United States had faced flu pandemic before, in 1889-90 for example, but ... the Henry Phipps Institute at the University of Pennsylvania had determined the ...
[PDF]The Influenza Pandemic, 1918 — 1919 - University of Sydney
interesting to look back at how an earlier influenza pandemic affected the University. The influenza pandemic of 1918 — 1919, known as “Spanish Flu” or “ La ...
The Great Flu « Iowa Pathways - Iowa Public Television
The outbreak of Spanish Influenza in 1918 killed 38 in Iowa City. ... When the influenza epidemic hit the United States in 1918 and 1919, more than 500,000 people died. ... At the University of Iowa 38 staff and students died from the flu or from ...
Spanish Flu of 1918: a look back at the brutal, relentless pandemic
Just like the H1N1 flu today, the Spanish Flu had a greater ability to infect the lungs ... military recruits who had reported for duty at the University of Colorado.
History of a forgotten epidemic. The pandemic of Spanish flu in ...
The Pandemic of spanish flu in Argentina, 1918–1919. Adrián Carbonetti*. * Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina. acarbonetti@cea.unc.edu.ar.
1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic - 20th Century History - About.com
Historical Importance of the 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic: In three waves, the Spanish flu spread quickly, killing an estimated 50 million to 100 million people ...
Libros sobre el término Pandemic of spanish flu
Pandemic 1918: Canada and the Spanish Influenza
Pandemic 1918: Canada and the Spanish Influenza
Prescott North, 2012
In the early 20th century, inhabitants of the world found themselves surrounded by war and disease. Tens of millions perished in the fighting of World War I, but the Spanish Influenza virus killed tens of millions more. In Canada, the death toll is estimated at around 50 000 lives lost to the virus that is still a mystery today.
Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919
Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919
David Killingray, Howard Phillips, 2003
of the Spanish flu, a dimension which he actively encouraged later historians of the pandemic to heed by his generosity in making readily available to them his store of letters from flu survivors. Nevertheless, it was not principally the sales of ...
1918 flu pandemic: Influenza pandemic, Spanish flu research, 2009 flu pandemic, List of epidemics, List of wars...
1918 flu pandemic: Influenza pandemic, Spanish flu research, 2009 flu pandemic, List of epidemics, List of wars...
Frederic P. Miller, Agnes F. Vandome y John McBrewster, 2010
Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.The 1918 flu pandemic was an influenza pandemic that spread to nearly every part of the world. It was caused by an unusually virulent and deadly influenza A virus strain of subtype H1N1. Historical and epidemiological data ...
Pandemic: Spanish Flu, 1918
Pandemic: Spanish Flu, 1918
Sally Stone, 2012
World War I is finally drawing to an end, and 11-year old Freda Stone is looking forward to the return of her brother Bobby from the Western Front.
Coulson's Wife (The Coulson Series)
Coulson's Wife (The Coulson Series)
Anna J. McIntyre y Elizabeth Mackey, 2014
The beginning of the Coulson Empire, 1918: Mary Ellen’s father didn’t trade her for a house–exactly. Marrying the wealthy and handsome Randall Coulson is not something Mary Ellen wants to do, but being the obedient daughter she agrees to the marriage. Randall Coulson wants Mary Ellen for one reason–to give him sons. He has no desire to form a bond ...
Pandemic Influenza: Emergency Planning and Community ...
Pandemic Influenza: Emergency Planning and Community ...
Jeffrey R. Ryan, 2008
This critically acclaimed work provides public health officials, doctors, responders, and emergency planners with accurate current information that will help them understand the nature of an outbreak, assess risk, answer public concerns, ...
Bird Flu: The New Emerging Infectious Disease
Bird Flu: The New Emerging Infectious Disease
Viroj Wiwanitkit, 2008
Chapter 1 The Emergence of Bird Flu, a Global Problem History of Previous Influenza Pandemics In history, there have been three will-documented previous influenza pandemics. 1. Spanish Flu (1 - 8) Spanish flu is a pandemic caused by the ...
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Entradas de blog sobre el término
Pandemic of spanish flu
Spanish Influenza Pandemic and Vaccines — History of Vaccines
www.historyofvaccines.org/content/blog/spanish-influenza-pandemic-and-vaccines
1918 flu pandemic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic
1918 Flu Pandemic That Killed 50 Million Originated in China, Historians Say
The worldwide flu pandemic that killed 50 million people in 1918 may have originated with transported Chinese laborers, archival records suggest.
news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/01/140123-spanish-flu-1918-china-origins-pandemic-science-health/
Spanish flu, the pandemic that killed 50 million, started in China — but may have spread via Canada, historian says | National Post
The flu appears to have originated in China before spreading via trainloads of labourers passing through Canada to Europe, Humphries argues
news.nationalpost.com/2014/02/04/spanish-flu-the-pandemic-that-killed-50-million-started-in-china-but-may-have-spread-via-canada-historian-says/
The 1918 Flu Pandemic or Spanish Flu
In 1918 much of the world was at war. The world would soon come under siege by something much smaller and deadlier than enemy forces. More people would die because of this this small invader than were killed during the entire first world war. Between 1918-...
comfortdoc.squidoo.com/spanish-flu
Influenza ("Spanish Flu" Pandemic, 1918-19) | Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia
As World War I drew to a close in November 1918, the influenza virus that took the lives of an estimated 50 million people worldwide in 1918 and 1919 began its deadly ascent. The pandemic hit Philadelphia exceptionally hard.
philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/influenza-spanish-flu-pandemic-1918-19/
Influenza 1918 . American Experience . WGBH | PBS
Early in the morning of March 11, 1918, a young private reported to the Army hospital at Fort Riley, Kansas, complaining of fever, sore throat, and headache. Then, another sick soldier appeared, then another and another. By noon, the hospital had more than one hundred cases; in a week, there were five hundred. Forty-eight soldiers died at Fort Riley that spring. No one knew why. _Influenza 1918_ is the story of the worst epidemic the United States has ever known. Before it was over, the flu would kill more than 600,000 Americans -- more than all the combat deaths of this century combined. "For the survivors we spoke to," says producer Robert Kenner, "the memory is one of horror and fear -- which may explain why many Americans were willing to let those few terrible months fade into obscurity. Schoolchildren know more about the Black Plague from centuries ago than they do about this episode in our recent history." America in 1918 was a nation at war. Draft call-ups, bond drives, troop shipments were all in high gear when the flu epidemic appeared. American soldiers from Fort Riley carried the disease to the trenches of Europe, where it mutated into a killer virus. The disease would later be dubbed, inaccurately, Spanish influenza. Spain had suffered from a devastating outbreak of influenza in May and June of 1918. The country, being a non-combatant in the war, did not censor news of the epidemic that was cutting through its population and was therefore incorrectly identified as its place of origin. Meanwhile, returning American troops were bringing the flu back home. First hundreds, then thousands, of soldiers were lining up outside infirmaries and hospitals at army bases across the country, falling ill with a swiftness that defied belief. Dr. Victor Vaughan, Surgeon General of the Army, was stunned by "what he saw at Camp Devens":http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/influenza/storyHighlights just outside of Boston. "Every bed is full, yet others crowd in," he wrote. "The faces wear a bluish cast; a cough brings up the blood-stained sputum. In the morning, the dead bodies are stacked about the morgue like cordwood." On the day Vaughan arrived, sixty-three men died at Camp Devens. In September, the disease spread to the civilian population. It moved swiftly down the eastern seaboard to New York, "Philadelphia":http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/ influenza/storyHighlights and beyond. Anna Milani remembers sitting on her front step one day: "Diagonally across from us a fifteen-year-old girl was just buried. Toward evening, we heard a lot of screaming going on. In that same house, a little eighteen-month-old baby passed away." That month, 12,000 Americans died of influenza. It was a flu unlike any other. People could be healthy in the morning and dead by nightfall. Others died more slowly, suffocating from the buildup of liquid in their lungs. Thanks to advances in microbiology, researchers had developed vaccines for many bacterial diseases: smallpox, anthrax, rabies, diphtheria, meningitis. But doctors were helpless to stop the influenza of 1918. Though they knew the disease spread through the air, medical researchers were unable to see the tiny virus through microscopes of the time and incorrectly identified its cause as a bacteria. Vaccines they developed didn't work; the virus was too small, too elusive. With medical science powerless, many people turned to folk remedies: garlic, camphor balls, kerosene on sugar, boneset tea. Public health officials distributed masks, closed schools; laws forbade spitting on the streets. Nothing worked. And the war was at cross-purposes with the epidemic: the war effort brought people into the streets for rallies and bond drives. They coughed on each other, infected each other. Soldiers traveled in crowded transport ships. The disease spread everywhere. October saw the epidemic's full horror: more than 195,000 people died in America alone. There was a nationwide shortage of caskets. In Philadelphia, the dead were left in gutters and stacked in caskets on the front porches. Trucks drove the city streets, picking up the caskets and corpses. People hid indoors, afraid to interact with their friends and neighbors. "Everybody was living in deadly fear because it was so quick, so sudden, and so terrifying," says William Sardo, the son of a funeral director whose home was stacked with caskets of flu victims. "It destroyed the intimacy that existed among people." Surgeon General Vaughan reached a frightening conclusion. "If the epidemic continues its mathematical rate of acceleration," he announced, "civilization could easily disappear from the face of the earth within a few weeks." Then, just as suddenly as it struck, the calamitous disease abruptly began to vanish. By mid-November, the numbers of dead were plunging. "In light of our knowledge of influenza," says "Dr. Shirley Fannin":http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/, a Los Angeles County public health official, "we do understand that it probably ran out of fuel. It ran out of people who were susceptible and could be infected." Over time, World War I and painful memories associated with the epidemic caused it to be mostly forgotten. But for the survivors, the influenza of 1918 changed their lives forever.
www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/influenza/
Spanish Flu | Skeptical Raptor's Blog
Discussing science, medicine, and pseudoscience
www.skepticalraptor.com/skepticalraptorblog.php/tag/spanish-flu/
Pandemic Payoff from 1918: A Weaker H1N1 Flu Today - Scientific American
www.scientificamerican.com/article/pandemic-payoff/
The History of the Great 1918 Flu Pandemic: We All Wore Masks
Introduction: Gena Philibert-Ortega is a genealogist and author of the book ?From the Family Kitchen.? In this guest blog post, Gena researches old newspap
blog.genealogybank.com/the-history-of-the-great-1918-flu-pandemic-we-all-wore-masks.html
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